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Site maintenance update

29 Jun 2015: 

The TRIP website is now unlocked and it is possible to submit new projects, news and events to the Portal.

Site maintenance work is still underway but our engineers are able to undertake this phase of the work without affecting TRIP users. The website will be locked for one final period before the improvements are completed. We will provide a further update when this final body of work is scheduled.

The improvements being made to the TRIP website will make it easier for users to find and submit transport research information. For more information, please email the TRIP helpdesk: TRIP-helpdesk@ricardo-aea.com

Kind regards

TRIP team

Transport Minister Andrew Jones welcomes huge rise in take up of ultra low emissions vehicles

Transport Minister Andrew Jones welcomes huge rise in take up of ultra low emissions vehicles

29 Jun 2015: 

Transport Minister Andrew Jones today (11 June 2015) welcomed the substantial increase in the number of new ultra low emission vehicles registered in the United Kingdom.

A total of 9,046 ultra low emission vehicles were registered in the first quarter of 2015 – a rise of 366% from the same period in 2014.

Transport Minister Andrew Jones said:

I am delighted to see such a huge rise in the number of people buying ultra low emission vehicles. The Go Ultra Low campaign is making low emission vehicles an increasingly popular choice and the government is investing £500 million over the next 5 years in making them more accessible to families and businesses across the country.

It’s a great example of Britain leading the way in developing sustainable transport options that are affordable for everyone.

View the vehicle licensing figures for the January to March 2015.

UK AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR BOLSTERS SAFETY WITH LAUNCH OF RECALLS SEARCH TOOL

UK AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR BOLSTERS SAFETY WITH LAUNCH OF RECALLS SEARCH TOOL

29 Jun 2015: 

The Vehicle Safety Recall search tool, which operates using the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) also directs motorists to their nearest dealer so any necessary remedial work can be carried out as quickly as possible. It offers a one-stop-shop for owners and buyers of used cars and vans to check if vehicles are subject to an outstanding safety recall that they, or a previous owner, may have missed.

The new service is available online via Motor Codes (motorcodes.co.uk), the automotive industry’s government-approved regulatory body, and is funded and managed by SMMT.

The UK’s vehicle recall process, administered by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA), is already stringent and highly successful. The number of vehicles repaired following a recall campaign in the UK consistently exceeds 90% – one of the most successful compliance records anywhere in the world, and some two and a half times higher than the average rate for all consumer goods in the UK. The number of recall campaigns in the UK has fallen by more than a quarter since 2010, further demonstrating the industry’s strong track record on safety performance.

There are 36 million cars and light commercial vehicles on British roads, and manufacturers are committed to ensuring they remain safe throughout their lifecycles, through safety tests as well as by closely monitoring any customer incidents.

SMMT Chief Executive Mike Hawes said, “The UK vehicle recall process is one of the most robust in the world, and manufacturers are constantly striving to make it even better. Essential recalls can be missed when a vehicle transfers between owners so this portal provides a fast way of checking any safety issues. Vehicle manufacturers are committed to delivering the highest standards of safety and record keeping, to ensure the UK’s excellent vehicle safety record is maintained.”

Mark Terry, Managing Director at Motor Codes, said, “Motor Codes is the automotive industry watchdog and consumer champion, so we are well placed to deliver this service. We are committed to helping UK motorists identify if their car has an outstanding vehicle safety recall issue and to enabling manufacturers to meet their obligations in rectifying these issues.”

Owners and buyers can check the safety recall status of almost any given car or van at motorcodes.co.uk/vehicle-recall by simply keying in the vehicle’s VIN – the 17-character number found in the car’s log book (V5C) and in the vehicle itself. The service also provides guidance on what to do in the event of an outstanding recall and allows users to link directly to their local dealer to arrange repair work.

ENGINEERING SAFER ROADS: STAR RATING ROADS FOR IN-BUILT SAFETY

ENGINEERING SAFER ROADS: STAR RATING ROADS FOR IN-BUILT SAFETY

26 Jun 2015: 

ENGINEERING SAFER ROADS: STAR RATING ROADS FOR IN-BUILT SAFETY

ROAD SAFETY FOUNDATION FOCUS ON TWO KEY ROUTES

  • A404, Buckinghamshire, named Britain’s most improved road:
  • Improved overall from 2-star to 3-star
  • An improvement of a star typically halves the cost and number of serious crashes
  • Safety measures on A404 cut crashes by 90% over the survey period
  • A285, West Sussex, named Britain’s persistently highest risk road:
  • 85% of 12 mile route rates 1-star or 2-star for motorcyclists and vehicle occupants
  • Simple safety measures costing £3 million might return a £11 million saving over their economic life and 45 deaths and serious injuries on A285 alone

Cash-strapped local authorities facing the challenge of reducing road deaths and serious injuries on their network now have access to a list of initiatives they can take to target risk points, along with the cost and value of the benefits each initiative brings. In a report out today from the Road Safety Foundation “Engineering Safer Roads: Star Rating Roads for in-built safety” the costs and benefits are listed, supported by two real examples: where the road has been improved and is now saving lives and money (A404); and where improvements are needed on the UK’s persistently highest risk road (A285).

With half of road deaths concentrated on just 10 per cent of the busy main road network outside major towns and cities, targeting can pay substantial dividends, the report says. Risks on different sections of road vary tenfold as the same drivers in the same vehicles turn from one road section into another. Risks also vary according to the type of road user, but the majority of road deaths remain to car occupants. Road deaths are concentrated on country roads outside major towns and cities at speeds where the vehicle’s protection alone is not enough to safeguard against brutal impacts at junctions, with roadside objects and in head-on crashes.

Case study: A404 Buckinghamshire – the UK’s most improved road

Between 2007-09, the 6 mile (9 km) stretch of the A404 between the M25 and Amersham suffered 2 deaths and serious injuries every mile and was rated medium-high risk. Two-thirds of the 12 crashes involved vehicle occupants; for these road users the majority of the route scored 2-star.

Discussions with Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire County Councils revealed the authorities had carried out a programme of low cost and straightforward measures that included re-surfacing, improved road markings, lowering the speed limit and improving pedestrian crossings on a stretch where pedestrians were especially vulnerable. Together with improvements from behaviour and vehicles, fatal and serious crashes involving vehicle occupants were cut by 88 per cent; while deaths and injuries to pedestrians fell from four to zero in the 2010-12 period. The road now has an overall 3-star score for both vehicle occupants and pedestrians and has a low risk rating.

Case study: A285 West Sussex – the UK’s persistently higher risk road

The A285 is a challenge for the road authority, West Sussex County Council. In 2014, Road Safety Foundation reported that the risk increased by 17% between 2007-09 and 2010-12 – against a background of a national reduction in crashes.

The road, between Chichester and Petworth, is 12 miles (19 km) long and 47 people were killed or seriously injured on it in during the two periods analysed in the 2014 report (2007-12). 96% of the deaths and serious injuries were to vehicle occupants and motorcyclists.

Just 15 per cent of the road achieves a desired 3-star minimum rating for vehicle occupants and motorcyclists. 25% of the route scores 1-star for vehicle occupants; 35% for motorcyclists.

Interventions proposed by the Road Safety Foundation for detailed investigation include rumble strips along roadside edges, central lane hatching, clearance of roadside hazards, street lighting, and marking improvements.

Most safety engineering infrastructure improvements would deliver savings in road trauma for many years after installation, with a spend of £3m giving an economic return of £11m over the economic life of the investment; while some proposed interventions at specific points that might repay costs four times over. 45 deaths and serious injuries might be expected to be saved over the next 20 years on this small route, and if implemented, 100% of the route would score 3-star minimum for vehicle occupants.

“Getting the most out of existing budgets is an imperative,” says Caroline Moore, author of the Road Safety Foundation Report. “Serious road crashes are expensive and this report shows that interventions are often simple and cost effective. As central government increasingly devolves responsibility for the costs of health and long term care, there are now new reasons for local authorities to study the cost of road crashes on their road network and why bringing ‘A’ roads up to a minimum 3-star standard for in-built safety in the period to 2030 makes sense.”

The report is sponsored by Ageas, whose chief executive, Andy Watson says: “Ageas is committed to influencing the public debate and encouraging action on improving the safety of our roads. We are long-term sponsors of the RSF’s road assessment programme and I am pleased to see this new report which expands on its findings. It provides further evidence and information about what measures can reduce the suffering associated with road deaths and injuries, and will be an important resource for local and national bodies.”

Ends/more

Notes to editors

Safe Road Design – the costs and the casualty reductions they can offer:

Countermeasure

Casualty reduction

Cost

Delineation

10-25%

Low

Central hatching

10-25%

Low

Rumble strips

10-25%

Low

Skid resistance

25-40%

Low

Roadside hazard removal

25-40%

Low

Side slope improvement

10-25%

Medium

Roadside barriers

40-60%

Medium

Speed management

25-40%

Medium

Shoulder sealing

25-40%

Medium

Lane widening

25-40%

Medium-high

Median barrier

>60%

Medium-high

Additional lane

25-40%

High

Realignment

10-40%

High

Dualling

25-40%

High

Reducing head-on crashes

Head-on crashes are generally the most severe of all vehicle crash types. The combined mass and speed of vehicles often result in serious or fatal consequences for vehicle occupants.

Even in the most modern cars, the chances of surviving a head-on crash at speeds above 40mph are greatly reduced. For older vehicles, or in crashes involving vehicles of different size, surviving such a crash is less likely at far lower speeds.

This crash type occurs when one vehicle leaves its path and comes into the path of the oncoming vehicle.

Often this type of crash results from a steering wheel overcorrection, eg a driver veers to the roadside, instinctively turns the steering wheel to return to the road and travels across the carriageway.

Reducing junction crashes

Countermeasure

Casualty reduction

Cost

Delineation

10-25%

Low

Turn lane

10-25%

Low-medium

Skid resistance

25-40%

Low-medium

Signalisation

25-40%

Medium

Speed management

25-40%

Medium

Roundabout

>60%

Medium-high

Grade separation

25-40%

High

Junction crashes are one of the most common types of crash problem in Britain. In rural areas, or where vehicle speeds are high, the consequences of crashes involving brutal side impacts at junctions are frequently severe.

The chances of avoiding serious injury or death reduce dramatically above 30mph for side impacts for the most modern types of cars, and is far less than this for older vehicles, and particularly for vulnerable road users.

Countermeasure

Casualty reduction

Cost

Delineation

10-25%

Low

Rumble strips

10-25%

Low

Skid resistance

25-40%

Low

Roadside hazard removal

25-40%

Low

Side slope improvement

10-25%

Medium

Roadside barriers

40-60%

Medium

Shoulder sealing

25-40%

Medium

Speed management

25-40%

Medium

Lane widening

25-40%

Medium to high

Median barrier

Medium-high

Realignment

10-40%

High

Reducing run-off crashes

Run-off-road crashes are common, especially in high speed areas. They occur at bends and on straight sections of road. In high speed environments they can have severe outcomes, particularly if an object is hit (for example trees, poles, pedestrians) or there is a steep embankment or cliff.

Research shows that the survival rate for hitting an object head-on reduces significantly above 40mph, while a side impact into a pole or tree is greatly reduced at speeds above 25mph. Therefore, the consequences of running off the road above this speed will often be severe.

Countermeasure

Casualty reduction

Cost

Fencing

25-40%

Low

Improve visibility (obstruction removal)

25-40%

Low-medium

Parking improvements

10-25%

Low-medium

Refuge island

25-40%

Low-medium

Installing crossing

25-40%

Low-medium

Shoulder sealing

25-40%

Medium

Speed management

25-40%

Medium

Street lighting

10-25%

Medium

Traffic calming

25-40%

Medium-high

Grade separation crossing

>60%

High

Reducing crashes with pedestrians and cyclists

Just under a quarter of all road deaths in Britain are pedestrians and 6 per cent are cyclists.

The severity of crashes with these vulnerable road users is strongly dependent on the speed of traffic. Research shows that the chances of a vulnerable road user surviving an impact with a motorised vehicle reduces significantly above 20mph, and even at lower speeds than this, serious harm can be caused, especially to older people or children.

Full report at http://www.roadsafetyfoundation.org/

Read the latest TRIP newsletter

Read the latest TRIP newsletter

24 Jun 2015: 

June's edition of the monthly TRIP newsletter is available here: http://bit.ly/1BMjGhd

Four key themes for rail innovation

Four key themes for rail innovation

23 Jun 2015: 

Produced in cooperation with the Rail Executive and transport user watchdog Transport Focus, the Innovation Consultation report pulls together the ideas and insights from the February 2015 workshops held in Norwich, Ipswich, Cambridge and Chelmsford as part of the Transport Systems Catapult’s work for the current East Anglia franchise competition.

Most of the ideas put forward by the rail users who attended the workshops could be grouped into four key themes:

  • Ticketing and a “fare deal”
  • Seamless end-to-end journeys
  • Building customer loyalty
  • A greater on-board experience

After exploring these themes in more detail, the report lists some of the individual ideas put forward by the workshop participants. Under “Ticketing and a ‘fare deal’” for example, proposals included: more intelligent ticket vending machines where regular customers can have a personalised account; smart cards that allow for automatic compensation following delays; and, something between a ‘season ticket’ and a regular ‘one-off’ ticket.

“The ground-breaking work of the Innovation in Rail Franchising team has been one of the great, early successes of the Transport Systems Catapult, and this report goes right to the heart of what this programme is all about – giving voice to the rail users themselves,” said Transport Systems Catapult CEO Steve Yianni.

“There are plenty of surveys that deal with rail users’ gripes and complaints, but this report goes beyond that, by encouraging the rail users to express their own great ideas for improving services, including a number of suggestions that they have seen working in other industries.”

The report, which has already been made available to the companies involved in the East Anglia franchise competition, was also welcomed by Transport Focus’s Passenger Director, David Sidebottom, who said: “We welcome initiatives that get passengers involved in the development of ideas and decision making … [and] were pleased to partner with Transport Systems Catapult on finding out how innovation can achieve this.”

Please click here for a full copy of the report, including contact details for the Transport Systems Catapult’s Innovation in Rail Franchising team. Read more about the Innovation in Rail Franchising programme here.

Half a billion euro EU funding for transport research projects

Half a billion euro EU funding for transport research projects

23 Jun 2015: 

The selected projects cover all transport modes - air, rail, road, waterborne transport - as well as cross-cutting priorities: green solutions for urban transport, development of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS), logistics and infrastructure improvements.

All 75 projects were selected under two calls for project proposals: Mobility for Growth and Green Vehicles.

Two more sub-calls for project proposals just closed in the area of Mobility for Growth, and one call in the area of Green Vehicles will open for submissions on 24 June 2015. There will be further funding opportunities for research and innovation projects in the field of transport, please visit theParticipant Portal for more information.

The projects are each implemented by a consortium of European partners. The Innovation And Networks Executive Agency (INEA) will monitor their progress throughout the project life-cycle.

Overall, €6.3 billion have been earmarked for Transport Research in Horizon 2020, the main EU's funding programme for the period 2014-2020.

More information

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